Liver Health and Osteoporosis

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Fortifying Yin: Chinese Secrets for Battling Chronic Liver Disease

The Link Between Liver and Heart Health

Nicole Cutler

Feb 9th, 2009

Learn about astherosclerosis (a health condition that causes high blood pressure, heart disease and can even contribute to some liver diseases), as well as the study that undoubtedly demonstrates the interconnectivity between liver and heart health. You’ll also discover seven lifestyle choices that are beneficial for liver and heart disease prevention or managing your health while living with one of these conditions – tips that can help prevent and reduce astherosclerosis.

Our culture may be propelling us to new technological heights, but it is also initiating our spiral down into ill health. Only by being conscious of how every personal choice affects our physical well being can we begin to make the changes necessary to see our grandchildren grow. As the connection between living an unhealthy lifestyle and the development of chronic disease is more fully realized, researchers are uncovering an increasing number of connections between different health conditions.

Liver and Heart
Although the liver and heart partner together to ensure blood circulates healthfully throughout the body, few people consider the two to be a team. However, research on atherosclerosis confirms a tight connection between liver and heart pathology.

Physiologically, blood and bile intimately tie liver and heart health together:

· Blood – The liver receives 25 percent of the blood pumped by the heart and filters over two quarts of blood a minute. To ensure optimal circulation and filtration, the heart pumps blood while the liver cleans it.

· Bile – To dissolve fat in the blood vessels, the liver produces up to two cups of bile a day. Without bile, our arteries would be as hard as rocks without any hope of circulating blood throughout the heart, liver or remainder of the body.

Atherosclerosis comes from the Greek words athero (meaning gruel or paste) and sclerosis (hardness). It describes the process in which deposits of fatty substances, cholesterol, cellular waste products, calcium and other substances build up in the inner lining of an artery. Called plaque, this buildup can grow large enough to significantly reduce the blood’s flow through an artery. In addition to the danger of breaking off and throwing a blood clot into circulation, this restriction of blood flow can cause high blood pressure, heart disease and can even contribute to some liver diseases.

Page 1 2 3, Beyond Liver Conditions: Other Uses for Milk Thistle with Clinical Guidelines, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., American Botanical Council, 2004., Atherosclerosis, American Heart Association, Inc., 2007., Inflammation, Heart Disease and Stroke: The Role of C-Reactive Protein, American Heart Association, Inc., 2007., Metabolic Syndrome, American Heart Association, Inc.k 2007., New Data Suggest that Patients with Chronic Liver Disease are at Increased Risk for Heart Disease, Liz Highleyman,, 2007., Spotlight on Liver Disease: Improving Today’s Treatments, MediLexicon International Ltd., May 2007. Atherosclerosis, University of Maryland Medical Center, 2007., The Hard-Liver’s Guide to the Liver, WebMD Corporation, 2007.

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